Denis Villeneuve: “Blade Runner 2049” Talks at Google

blade runner 2049 stream reddit This is a topic that many people are looking for. bluevelvetrestaurant.com is a channel providing useful information about learning, life, digital marketing and online courses …. it will help you have an overview and solid multi-faceted knowledge . Today, bluevelvetrestaurant.com would like to introduce to you Denis Villeneuve: “Blade Runner 2049” Talks at Google. Following along are instructions in the video below:

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00. 49 51 00 55 00 57 00 59 01 00 01 02 01 05 01 06 01 07 01 10 01 14 01 17 01 20 01 22 01 24 01 27 01 32 01 35 01 38 01 42 01 45 01 48 01 51 i m feeling a bit nervous but about the no first of all when i heard that nridley scott andrew kosove and broderick johnson from alcon nwere starting a project that will be a follow up nto the first runner. I said to myself whoa what an insane strong nbeautiful great bad idea because it s like like nyou. The first movie is by far one nmy favorite ones.

It s a movie that is linked to nthe birth of my love to cinema. I mean where i started nto dream to be a director. So it s like a church and the thing is nthat. What convinced me was the screenplay.

When ni read the screenplay. When i had a chance to nread the screenplay. The screenplay was written nby. Anthony fincher.

Who was the writer of nthe original movie he came with a very strong nidea. Very strong poem and then he worked in ncollaboration with ridley. So it s from the start. Nthat secured me.

A lot. The idea that both fathers were nat. The helm of the project. And then michael ngreen came on board and made a very nstrong screenplay and from there all the pressure nwas before i took the decision because i had a talk nwith.

Ryan gosling at one point that we ll resume nthe spirit of the journeys. We said to ourselves both ntogether at the beginning when we decided to do it nthat our chances of success were very narrow 03 49 03 53 03 55 03 59 04 04 04 08 04 10 04 13 04 14 04 18 04 22 04 24 04 28 04 30 04 34 04 39 04 41 04 42 04 45 04 49 04 52 04 52 04 54 04 57 05 00 05 01 05 03 05 07 05 11 05 15 05 17 05 22 the screenplay was ready nharrison loved the screenplay and so that s where ni came on board. And so the input nof ridley is huge because he created nthe screenplay. He wrote the screenplay nwith anton and michael.

So that s huge the nbirth of the ideas from there when i met nhim to get on board. I needed his blessing that was one of my let s say nconditions to get on board. I need to meet the man look nat him in the eyes and say is it ok. And he was very gracious nvery gentlemanly.

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00. And so the world in 2049. We nwent back to analog technology. So we went back to an analog nworld where they rely only on real on concrete not nconcrete what s it french translator something that s tangible ntangible technology analog technology and that for me was a blessing nbecause it allowed my character to travel to open doors to nenter rooms to meet people to demis hassabis get naway from the screen.

Denis villeneuve get away nfrom the screen. Yeah demis hassabis. Fantastic. Denis villeneuve and i m about nto make another sci fi movie and my goal is to try nto avoid screens.

Again to try to be in contact nwith reality more demis hassabis fantastic so another really nimportant. I think sort of pillar of the natmosphere in the first film was the music. I think the vangelis score nis kind of an amazing score. And actually created a lot nof.

The feeling in the film. How did you approach the nmusic for the new film. Denis villeneuve. It s a nvery.

Very important element. It was such iconic score because nit was like the landscape that we all saw in nthe first movie that were so dystopic and dystopian nand dark and depressive. But on top of it you had that nbeautiful melancholic poetic. Very delicate music with nthose dark.

Spectral drums. That created the kind of nreligious feeling on top of it and we did a lot of nexploration with music. But when you do a n you cannot go very nfar from the cs. 80.

Which is the original nsynthesizer that vangelis used and i insisted and at one npoint. I had to put my foot down. I said ok we are ngoing in that direction as much as roger ndeakins and i tried to make sure that some nof. The parts of the movie would be very nclose aesthetically to the first movie because it s nstill.

A detective film noir it s a to be in that kind nof aesthetic zone. And it s the same for the sound. So we worked very hard to ncreate a soundtrack that would be as close to the sound neffects like in the first one and at the same time have nthat kind of melancholia that is so beautiful and nthat very specific sound those cs 80s. They are beasts they are really impressive nmachines.

Very delicate and i m very proud of the score. I must say that s nthe thing that when you make a movie. I just finished a nmovie a few weeks ago. I have no distance.

But there are some nelements of it and i know that the score nben wallfisch and hans zimmer did a fantastic job demis hassabis. Yeah. I can t wait to hear that so it sounds like you re a nbig fan of science fiction. I mean you say you re doing nanother science fiction film.

But it s interesting that as an nai practitioner. Often in films portrayal of ai. And nrobots is sometimes negative and antagonistic nwith. Some notable exceptions like the robots in n.

They were fantastic so i hope you produce some nfilms with a positive image of ai in the future. But it was interesting nin. The original runner maybe they were the nheroes of the film. I was always thinking do nyou feel like rutger hauer and roy batty.

His character nwas actually the hero. Denis villeneuve. Nthat s the thing that i think got people nconfused about the first film is that harrison ford was at nthe time han solo and indiana jones was not a hero. He was a dark hero anti hero.

And that was very nconfusing for people no definitely the replicants nare a mirror of ourselves they represent our anger to nour maker our human condition demis hassabis. I think one nof the things that we all fell in love with in the first n. You re continuing nin. The new film is it s not really a film nabout technology in some ways right.

It s actually about nphilosophy and deeper things like consciousness identity nand. What it means to be alive mortality. I think that s nwhat. It was about denis villeneuve.

Ni will say again that we respected that nspirit in the second one the technology is there to ncreate a more dynamic story. But it s not in the nforeground. At all 16. 33.

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19. 39. It s like the ncomplexity of humanity. That struggle to get nrid of the voices that are coming from the npast that i think we can t recreate with ai.

The fact that my weakness right nnow. How do you recreate that and those weakness are na very complex product of the education. I nreceived and the gift that i received from the nparents through the generations. It s your problem demis hassabis nso.

I mean i think the last scene of i would say one of the greatest nscenes in all the cinema. With roy batty and he rutger hauer sort nof releases. The dove into the air as he dies. What do you think nthat symbolizes.

I always thought that symbolized nthat. The replicant felt he had a soul is that what you read from it denis villeneuve. That s nthe way i read it too and it s a beautiful image. And what i love also nabout this image is that it came nfrom rutger hauer.

I love it i love it when actors nbring strong ideas and when an actor is nlike totally engulfed totally imbued totally in nposition of his character good actors strong nactors. They can become muses and they nbring strong ideas and i had the same experience nwith ryan gosling. Who brought some very strong ideas and there are some nscenes that i m very proud in the movie nthat. Honestly one of my favorite scenes nis.

A ryan gosling idea demis hassabis. So you like nyour actors to improvise. Denis villeneuve ni. Deeply love it i m from the documentary nwhere.

The thing i love about documentaries is nthat you put your camera in life and suddenly sometimes nlife organizes itself there s an accident in nfront of the camera that creates a strong cinematic nmoment cinematic poetry in front of the camera and the way i find it back nin fiction is with actors. And there s nothing nmore exciting for me than when an actor comes on nset and says. I didn t sleep. I have this idea and i nhave to try this idea that i love and i know that it s the nsame with roger deakins.

We tried to create to be ready we storyboard neverything. It s planned. But we always keep na space on set to make sure that the actors nhave the space to recreate something that was not planned it s always linked with nthe scene of course. But there s nothing nmore exciting for me than that an idea nthat.

I was not expecting that surprised me i call it the chaos of life and that s why i think nthat computer generated characters are always most of the time nthey are created by people behind the camera. They cannot create nthat spontaneity those accidents that bring nsparks of life and that surprise and that s why we are becoming nso surprised and excited as an audience member that s why cinema can evolve that s where cinema can nevolve is when we capture life in front of the camera. And there are several moments nlike that in 2049 demis hassabis. Yeah.

I can t imagine that nfilm..


Without rutger hauer. Sort of improvising nthose last lines. Denis villeneuve. Exactly exactly exactly exactly yeah.

And that s one of nthe. Reasons. Also why i love real sets. A real nenvironment that we constructed the sets and demis hassabis.

Because it nstimulates that in the actors probably denis villeneuve. The actor ncan focus on his interior and not on trying to imagine nand to be in relationship with something that is virtual that s why i don t nlike green screens. I like real environments demis hassabis yeah fantastic well i m sure there s many nquestions from the audience. We should open it up to the naudience now for questions.

Please. We should have some nmics around the place audience. Am. I allowed to ask na question about denis villeneuve.

Yes. I think so audience or will i get bounced. So. Yes.

Denis villeneuve. Yes audience ok great so that was my baseball bat moment. The. Ted chiang short nstory is so impactful so beautiful.

But it s so tied up in nlanguage and the written word and the way that he sort of i don t know who s read it but ngo and read it it s awesome. But the way it s tied up in nlanguage and the written word is so complicated. How did you approach turning nthe story of time and language and how it affects the nmind into something that you could put on screen. Denis villeneuve.

You know what when you do an adaptation nit s a very violent process. Because there s a nbrutal moment. When you need to destroy the original. I don t know if you will read nall the short story from ted chiang.

It s a little nmasterpiece. It s a gem. And as you rightly nsaid the way you play with language nand time. It s so beautiful and so nclever and so brilliant and to do a movie out nof.

It it s like first of all when i read nit and a producer offered me to adapt. It i didn t know nhow to because. I said to them it s a fantastic story and there s a movie nthere. But how because it s a story about na repetitive process an intellectual process.

And to find a cinematic nstructure. Out of this. It took. Screenwriter.

Eric nheisserer. That came on board and created this idea. Nof. Creating a tension.

A geopolitic tension nthat was making it maybe a more accessible story. And that was the key then the rest was na long process. The challenge of nthis movie was really to make sure that nbecause basically. It s a teacher that meets nstudents and they are teaching a language.

Together. So how do you make nthis a dynamic story that will not feel repetitive nand that will stay it took a long time in nthe screenwriting process. Even in shooting and the nmovie transformed itself not the main story nbut the process to find the right rhythm nand. The right elements.

It s not a simple question. It was a puzzle to make nby far the longest editing sessions of my life. The nmost complex sessions. And it was not a given.

Nat. The beginning. It was very very ndifficult movie to do yeah audience well thank nyou for doing it so well. Denis villeneuve.

But that s na. Very huge compliment. Thank you thank you audience. There are i believe nat least.

Six different cuts of the original n. In some cases. Noticeably. Ndifferent.

Endings. Did that make doing. Na. Sequel.

Difficult. Denis villeneuve. Yeah. 27.

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33. But me i love the fact. Nthat deckard is doubting about his own identity. He s unsure about that that i love that for me is like what a npart of the movie is about demis hassabis.

One nof..


The questions i want most wanted to ask nyou actually was could you clear up the 30 year nmystery. I had of when i used to spend nhours arguing with my friends about was deckard a replicant. But then the ndirector s cut seemed to confirm in my nopinion for sure with the unicorn in his dream nand. Then the unicorn origami.

So are you going to answer that but then you show an naged harrison ford. So then now it seems to suggest neither the replicants can age or he s not a replicant. Denis villeneuve. You nhave to watch the movie.

Demis. Hassabis. Right. So.

Do you actually answer. It. 29. 25.

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